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Thread: Speeding up motor

  1. #1
    Roboteer

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    So I have a mondeo seat motor that I'd like to use for my lifter, was cheap but it's very slow.

    Has anyone used one for their lifter and got it moving fast enough to snap up reasonably quickly? I

    I believe I can speed it up by increasing the voltage to it (bigger battery) but if i do this how high can it take? Would I need a larger esc than the 30a ones I have too?

  2. #2
    maddox10's Avatar
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    Rule of tumb; maximum 150% nominal voltage rating of a motor.

    But take care. There are motors that can't handle even that much overvolting.

    And most affordable motor/gearbox combinations will expierence a seriously shortened lifespan.

    On ampères. The fuse rating on the drivers seat motor is 30 amp.
    You probably can get away with the 30A ESC, but I wouldn't venture it.

  3. #3
    leorcc's Avatar
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    Rule of thumb is 150% of its rated Voltage. (12V * 1.5 = 18V, 24V * 1.5 = 36V, etc..)
    Best regards,
    Leo van Miert
    http://www.team-rcc.org

  4. #4
    Roboteer

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    Thanks to your both.

    Is there a way to increase the speed at the tip of the lifter without increasing the voltage? Changing the length of the arms or position of the motor etc?

  5. #5
    R9000's Avatar
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    Lengthening the arms will increase the tip speed, as would gearing the output shaft up. However you've got to remember, in either of these cases, you're trading torque for speed, and gearing systems introduce extra energy loss through friction. If you up the voltage, you're upping your speed and torque a little, but at the expense of a bigger battery and more energy cost. These are the trade-offs you have to think about.

  6. #6
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    To speed up linac weaponry you'd need a more powerful actuator so that the attachment point can be closer to the pivot, giving you a faster response time but still generating the same tip force.

  7. #7
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    Not sure what you mean daveimi, isn't the seat motor likely to be quite powerful given its previous life it moved people? I know slowly and not often but it'll be strong enough to use for a lifter won't it?
    Also not sure what you mean by closer to the pivot increasing the response time.

  8. #8
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    What you have is basically a linear actuator. They are slow by nature, so rather than damage it with an over volt you would be better getting a more powerful linear actuator and moving the attachment point of the actuator to the arm closer to the hinge. So for the same movement of the actuator, the arm moves a lot more quickly. This will give a much quicker movement, but require a lot more power from the actuator.

  9. #9
    Roboteer

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    Have you got the means to run the linear actuator yet on the voltage you intend to use it on? You could always attach progressively heavier weights to it to see what it can comfortably lift. From there you can figure out how much and how fast you can theoretically lift with it in your bot with different arm lengths for your lifter. Then you can see what the actuator is capable of and decide if it is going to be suitable for you or decide if you want to find something else.

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